Deaths for albinos down in Tanzania, but suffer stigma

According to CHRAGG Chairman, Mr Tom Nyanduga, atrocities against persons with albinism still hold, and he disclosed it in Dar es Salaam yesterday during a dialogue on ending the atrocities held at the CHRAGG building.

Deaths for albinos down in Tanzania, but suffer stigma

According to CHRAGG Chairman, Mr Tom Nyanduga, atrocities against persons with albinism still hold, and he disclosed it in Dar es Salaam yesterday during a dialogue on ending the atrocities held at the CHRAGG building.

20 June 2017 Tuesday 12:37
Deaths for albinos down in Tanzania, but suffer stigma

DESPITE a decrease in the killings of the people with albinism in Tanzania, both stigma and discrimination are still rising across society, the Commission for Human Rights and Good Governance has unveiled.

According to CHRAGG Chairman, Mr Tom Nyanduga, atrocities against persons with albinism still hold, and he disclosed it in Dar es Salaam yesterday during a dialogue on ending the atrocities held at the CHRAGG building.

“For now, cases of atrocities against people with albinism have greatly diminished compared to the previous days but there is still an increase in discrimination and stigma against our relatives with albinism,” Nyanduga said.

He says that for the children with albinism to stay in special centers due to the violence, discrimination and stigma would still deny them of their basic rights as other children in the society because they also need parental love and care.

The event involved various stakeholders who work to defend the rights of people with albinism, such as Under The Same Sun Tanzania (UTSS), and advocates of dialogue argue that it would work out strategies aimed at curbing violence against people with albinism within society.

UTSS Executive Director, Ms Vicky Mtetema said stigma and discrimination against people with albinism was a major challenge and urged members of the public to work with law enforcers to expose all incidents of violence against them.

She said many such incidents were beginning to occur at family level, and argued that family members weren’t “co operative” when it comes to providing evidence to law enforcement agencies.

“Many cases of violence against persons with albinism end up in acquittal … simply because investigating isn’t that easy, in the first place … it’s not working due to lack of evidence because they often involve family members who are afraid of testifying in courts,” she said.

On her part, Beatrice Mpangala from the department of public prosecutions, said “it’s difficult to expose and arrest the suspects… because many of these incidents occurs at night and at the remotest of areas where it takes time to get the required infor mation.”

For the past one year alone, 66 people with albinism had suffered violent attacks, all of them duly reported at various police stations; 55 of the suspects have been charged on the court of law–but eleven of the cases weren’t taken to the courts due to the lack of evidence.

Dailynews

Comments
Avatar
Your Name
Post a Comment
Characters Left:
Your comment has been forwarded to the administrator for approval.×
Attention! Any person who sends any kind of financial, legal, criminal, administrative liability arising from content that is likely to constitute a crime, illegal, threatening, disturbing, insulting and profane, derogatory, humiliating, vulgar, obscene, immoral, damaging to personality, Belongs to Member / Members.