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Elephant-human conflicts 'a sign of jumbos re-multiplyin' - expert

World Elephant Centre (WEC) scientist Dr Alfred Kikoti told The Guardian yesterday that the cases of elephants invading human settlements and destroying crops in different parts of the country was ample proof of an evident increase in their numbers.

Elephant-human conflicts 'a sign of jumbos re-multiplyin' - expert

World Elephant Centre (WEC) scientist Dr Alfred Kikoti told The Guardian yesterday that the cases of elephants invading human settlements and destroying crops in different parts of the country was ample proof of an evident increase in their numbers.

07 June 2017 Wednesday 14:29
Elephant-human conflicts 'a sign of jumbos re-multiplyin' - expert

 WHEREAS rising incidences of elephants attacking and killing people in Tanzania have much to do with invasions of human beings in their corridors, they also reflect an encouraging increase in the number of jumbos in recent times, wildlife experts have said.

World Elephant Centre (WEC) scientist Dr Alfred Kikoti told The Guardian yesterday that the cases of elephants invading human settlements and destroying crops in different parts of the country was ample proof of an evident increase in their numbers.

“Rather than complaining about the attacks, we should actually celebrate that the number of elephants is actually going up after many years of serious poaching,” Dr Kikoti said.

The WEC scientist, who is an expert in elephant behaviours, asserted that though human-wildlife conflict is a serious intermittent problem, the signs of the jumbo population re-multiplying were good.

Mkomazi National Park chief warden Marko Meoli predicted that the elephant-human conflicts will become more regular as the large mammals seek to reclaim their territories.

Meoli noted that human beings have developed a tendency of building their settlements along elephants’ corridors, much to the wrath of the jumbos.

He explained: “Thanks to their powerful sense of memory, elephants are able to recall their pathways even after many years”.

“They will therefore unleash their anger on any structure built in their way, or even kill people.”

Human-wildlife conflict refers to the interaction between wild animals and people and the resultant negative impact on people or their resources, or wild animals or their habitat.

According to Arusha-based wildlife expert Fredrick Mbwambo, since elephants as territorial animals like to mark their tracks, they will continue to wreak havoc on human settlements and their crops.“This is a serious problem that needs to be seriously dealt with or else we should brace ourselves for the worst,” Mbwambo warned.

The sentiments from the various wildlife experts were given in the wake of the deaths on Monday of two people in a wild elephant attack in Singida Region.

Earlier, a large group of stray elephants invaded five villages in Monduli District, Arusha Region, destroying hectares of crops and causing fear among villagers.

Last month, a herd of stray elephants was also sighted within the University of Dodoma (UDOM) campus, also causing consternation among members of the public.

According to the law, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism is responsible for compensating people who are victims of destruction caused by wildlife – in this case, the elephants.

Elephant-human conflicts 'a sign of jumbos re-multiplyin' - expert

 WHEREAS rising incidences of elephants attacking and killing people in Tanzania have much to do with invasions of human beings in their corridors, they also reflect an encouraging increase in the number of jumbos in recent times, wildlife experts have said.

World Elephant Centre (WEC) scientist Dr Alfred Kikoti told The Guardian yesterday that the cases of elephants invading human settlements and destroying crops in different parts of the country was ample proof of an evident increase in their numbers.

“Rather than complaining about the attacks, we should actually celebrate that the number of elephants is actually going up after many years of serious poaching,” Dr Kikoti said.

The WEC scientist, who is an expert in elephant behaviours, asserted that though human-wildlife conflict is a serious intermittent problem, the signs of the jumbo population re-multiplying were good.

Mkomazi National Park chief warden Marko Meoli predicted that the elephant-human conflicts will become more regular as the large mammals seek to reclaim their territories.

Meoli noted that human beings have developed a tendency of building their settlements along elephants’ corridors, much to the wrath of the jumbos.

He explained: “Thanks to their powerful sense of memory, elephants are able to recall their pathways even after many years”.

“They will therefore unleash their anger on any structure built in their way, or even kill people.”

Human-wildlife conflict refers to the interaction between wild animals and people and the resultant negative impact on people or their resources, or wild animals or their habitat.

According to Arusha-based wildlife expert Fredrick Mbwambo, since elephants as territorial animals like to mark their tracks, they will continue to wreak havoc on human settlements and their crops.“This is a serious problem that needs to be seriously dealt with or else we should brace ourselves for the worst,” Mbwambo warned.

The sentiments from the various wildlife experts were given in the wake of the deaths on Monday of two people in a wild elephant attack in Singida Region.

Earlier, a large group of stray elephants invaded five villages in Monduli District, Arusha Region, destroying hectares of crops and causing fear among villagers.

Last month, a herd of stray elephants was also sighted within the University of Dodoma (UDOM) campus, also causing consternation among members of the public.

According to the law, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Tourism is responsible for compensating people who are victims of destruction caused by wildlife – in this case, the elephants.

The Guardian

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