Tanzania: Chief Govt Chemist facing staff shortage

Chemicals inspection manager in the CGC’s office, Mr Fidelis Segumba, told a press conference in the city that his office had 195 staff members, 105 short of the required 300 staff members.

Tanzania: Chief Govt Chemist facing staff shortage

Chemicals inspection manager in the CGC’s office, Mr Fidelis Segumba, told a press conference in the city that his office had 195 staff members, 105 short of the required 300 staff members.

02 June 2017 Friday 12:01
Tanzania: Chief Govt Chemist facing staff shortage

 
The office of the Chief Government Chemist (CGC) yesterday said its contribution to the country’s industrialisation drive would be hampered by a shortage of staff.

Chemicals inspection manager in the CGC’s office, Mr Fidelis Segumba, told a press conference in the city that his office had 195 staff members, 105 short of the required 300 staff members.

“Since the fifth phase government’s plans to industrialise the country, we are supposed to be everywhere because industries will be built in all corners of the country. Our presence in all corners will enable us make close supervision, but the shortage jeopardises our strategies,” he said.

He noted that apart from the Eastern, Central, Lake, Southern Highlands and Northern Zonal offices, the CGC office was expected to shift to the designated capital of Dodoma and the office would be expanding according to the growth of towns and cities and subsequent establishment of industries.

According to him, currently CGC has offices at all boarders, including Namanga, Holili and Horohoro in the Northern Zone, Tunduma and Kasumulu in the Southern Highylands, Mtukula and Sirari in the Lake Zone and that chemicals entering the country were properly examined to control unwanted compounds from finding their way into the country.

He said the CGC office faced a shortage of motor vehicles, challenge, which undermined inspection and other office activities. “We have presented requests for increased human resources to respective authorities. The transport challenge is being worked on to increase the number of vehicles depending on the government’s budget,” he said.

Speaking on claims that imported chemicals were diverted into production of illicit drugs, Mr Segunda said his office was collaborating with the Commission of Drugs Control and Enforcement Authority (DCEA) for harmonisation of the business.

The Citizen

Updated: 02.06.2017 12:06
Comments
Avatar
Your Name
Post a Comment
Characters Left:
Your comment has been forwarded to the administrator for approval.×
<strong>Warning!</strong> Will constitute a criminal offense, illegal, threatening, offensive, insulting and swearing, derogatory, defamatory, vulgar, pornographic, indecent, personality rights, damaging or similar nature in the nature of all kinds of financial content, legal, criminal and administrative responsibility for the content of the sender member / members are belong.