Tanzania to host global justice heartland

LAKI-LAKI Hill, which is situated within the relatively remote Kisongo Ward on the outskirts of Arusha City, may become a global heartland of justice delivery, as more international legal institutions plan to set up their bases there.

Tanzania to host global justice heartland

LAKI-LAKI Hill, which is situated within the relatively remote Kisongo Ward on the outskirts of Arusha City, may become a global heartland of justice delivery, as more international legal institutions plan to set up their bases there.

08 May 2017 Monday 10:59
Tanzania to host global justice heartland

The Acting Chief Justice, Professor Ibrahim Juma, says Tanzania’s readiness to dedicate considerable resources for hosting international legal institutions, derives from its belief that investigation, trial and punishment for international crimes, is essential for the maintenance of peace and security as well as curbing impunity.

Prof Juma voiced the sentiments in Arusha at the weekend, during the formal opening of the ground-breaking colloquium for National, regional and International Judges at Laki-Laki Hill.

The event was organized by the United Nations Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT) Chambers. He reiterated the country's commitment to co-operate closely with international legal and judicial institutions for shared expertise and improving services.

“I am profoundly pleased to note that the Judicial Colloquium is the first event held in the Mechanism’s court building.

It is an exceptional start that honourable judges are the first to put the court building into use,” stated the MICT Registrar, Mr Olufemi Elias, in a statement presented on his behalf by the Head of Registry, Mr Samuel Akorimo, earlier on.

He said he was delighted to learn that other regional and international legal institutions would construct their bases and courts on Laki- Laki Hill to undertake their operations from a single justice-focused location towering above the Arusha City.

The inaugural Laki Laki Colloquium brought together national judges from the Tanzanian judiciary, notably the Chief Justice of Tanzania and judges of the High Court in Arusha, with sub-regional and regional judges from the East African Court of Justice (EACJ) and the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) located in Arusha, and Tanzanian and international judges from the Mechanism.

Others were Judge Theodor Meron, President of the MICT, President of the East African Court of Justice Dr Emmanuel Ugirashebuja, and President of the African Court on Human and Peoples’ Rights, Justice Sylvain Oré.

The Colloquium theme was built up on four foundational components of modern international criminal practice: the law of the crime of genocide, the law of crimes against humanity, the law of war crimes, and the law of modes of liability for international crimes, combined with associated discussion at each stage.

Dailynews

Updated: 08.05.2017 11:11
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