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Tanzania to introduce corruption subject in education curriculum soon-Minister

Minister Mkuchika said he will discuss with education counterpart to see on how to include the corruption subject in education curriculum in the country.

Tanzania to introduce corruption subject in education curriculum soon-Minister

Minister Mkuchika said he will discuss with education counterpart to see on how to include the corruption subject in education curriculum in the country.

09 October 2017 Monday 12:43
Tanzania to introduce corruption subject in education curriculum soon-Minister

By Azania Post Reporter

TANZANIA will soon introduce corruption subject in its education curriculum to help minimize or reduce unwanted acts in the society, hence improving social and economic development of the country.

This was announced today in Dar es Salaam by George Mkuchika who is the newly elected Minister in the President’s Office-Public Service Management and Good Governance soon after he was sworn in at State House.

Corruption is an act of giving or receiving something from someone in order to get a favour or something illegally, there are different types of it.

Minister Mkuchika said he will discuss with education counterpart to see on how to include the corruption subject in education curriculum in the country.

He said as a minister responsible for good governance, he would like to see that corruptions acts become minimal or reduced at all levels in the society.

“To start with I will talk with the Minister for education, science, technology and vocational training and see how we can incorporate the corruption subject from nursery to higher education in the country,” he said.

Mkuchika also thanked President John Magufuli for appointing him in the Ministry and pledged to work hard.

Experts say corruption threatens good governance, sustainable development, democratic process and fair business environment and other services.

Fighting corruption is increasingly an uphill struggle in Tanzania.  The government agency the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau (PCCB) has introduced anti-corruption clubs in primary schools as part of an effort to reach young people at an impressionable age and inculcate the values of open and responsible governance.

“We believe children at a tender age have the potential to fight corruption that is plaguing our society,” PCCB’s spokesperson Doreen Kapwani was quoted as saying.

The clubs are formed as student associations with the mission to sensitise pupils and teachers alike, to raise awareness and empower them to tackle the ills of corruption.

Pupils are encouraged to refrain from bad behaviour such as coming to school late, dressing indecently, abusing others, fighting, stealing, cheating in examinations or bribing teachers to get higher grades. The clubs implant core values to make young people responsible citizens, she said.

According to PCCB, 3,949 anti-corruption clubs with 266,300 members had been formed in primary and secondary schools in Tanzania by August 2013.

Tanzania is not alone in using student clubs.  According to Transparency International, anti-corruption associations in schools have been instrumental in addressing graft in 24 countries across the world, including Chile, Italy, Pakistan and Thailand.

Azania Post

Updated: 10.10.2017 09:33
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