Tanzania’s ATCL chief applauds China’s entry into commercial jet production

Tanzania’s Air Tanzania Company Limited (ATCL) Chief Executive Officer, Ladislaus Matindi said China’s entry into the commercial jet market will also enable airlines have a variety of planes to choose from.

Tanzania’s ATCL chief applauds China’s entry into commercial jet production

Tanzania’s Air Tanzania Company Limited (ATCL) Chief Executive Officer, Ladislaus Matindi said China’s entry into the commercial jet market will also enable airlines have a variety of planes to choose from.

15 May 2017 Monday 12:31
Tanzania’s ATCL chief applauds China’s entry into commercial jet production

China entry into the commercial jet production market will help ignite competition which will lead to lowering of the equipment’s prices and gradual air travel fares falling.

Tanzania’s Air Tanzania Company Limited (ATCL) Chief Executive Officer, Ladislaus Matindi said China’s entry into the commercial jet market will also enable airlines have a variety of planes to choose from.

Matindi told The Guardian that new infant airlines like ATCL will have multiple advantages including enabling small carriers negotiate better terms and bargaining with manufacturers such as Airbus and Boeing.

He further pointed out that the new Chinese build commercial jetliner which has successfully completed test flights has proved to be safe, efficient and comfortable according to official reports from Beijing.

Echoing similar sentiment was retired cabinet minister who also once served as ATCL CEO, Bakari Mwapachu who welcomed the Chinese success in manufacturing commercial jets but cautioned that there are a number of issues that still need to be observed.

Mwapachu pointed out that although the new plane provides an alternative to airline operators such as ATCL, international brand names such as Airbus and Boeing will still continue to dominated the global aviation industry.

He also cautioned about operational cost, safety and the cost of training pilots in flying the Chinese made jetliner.

“I think before deploying new technology, it is better to see what our neighbours use,” Mwapachu noted saying most pilots are trained to fly Western brands hence there is need to invest in both time and resources before acquiring the Chinese plane.

“This is advantageous to our nation and the airline as it provides alternative technology on the market,” he pointed out.

Recently, China's announced that test flight for its maiden commercial jet, the C919 was successfully completed between Beijing and Shanghai.

The 168-seat plane which is roughly the same size as Airbus's A320 and Boeing's 737-800, will roll out into the commercial aviation market globally by end next year.

The Guardian

Comments
Avatar
Your Name
Post a Comment
Characters Left:
Your comment has been forwarded to the administrator for approval.×
<strong>Warning!</strong> Will constitute a criminal offense, illegal, threatening, offensive, insulting and swearing, derogatory, defamatory, vulgar, pornographic, indecent, personality rights, damaging or similar nature in the nature of all kinds of financial content, legal, criminal and administrative responsibility for the content of the sender member / members are belong.