Eliminating Malaria in Africa by 2030 by reducing mosquito populations

Historically, this fact has been known for a long time and medicines to treat malaria as well as preventive measures have been developed, but they need to be supplemented in order to meet the African Union target to eliminate malaria by 2030.

Eliminating Malaria in Africa by 2030 by reducing mosquito populations

Historically, this fact has been known for a long time and medicines to treat malaria as well as preventive measures have been developed, but they need to be supplemented in order to meet the African Union target to eliminate malaria by 2030.

09 June 2017 Friday 13:05
Eliminating Malaria in Africa by 2030 by reducing mosquito populations

 Malaria is spread by female mosquitoes that pick up the parasite from an infected person then inject it in to the blood of the next bitten person.

Historically, this fact has been known for a long time and medicines to treat malaria as well as preventive measures have been developed, but they need to be supplemented in order to meet the African Union target to eliminate malaria by 2030.

Currently, efforts are doubling-up to also focus more on the transmitter of malaria parasites, the mosquito.

New tools are being developed through genetic engineering to reduce populations of mosquitoes in order to eliminate malaria in Africa.

A team of experts from NEPAD Agency led by Prof Aggrey Ambali, Head of Industrialization, Science, Technology and Innovation paid a courtesy call on the West African Economic and Monetary Union (WAEMU/UEMOA) Secretariat in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso to facilitate dialogue towards concerted efforts in building regulatory capacities to effectively manage the genetic engineering innovation.

The call to WAEMU/UEMOA is very important as the development of this mosquito elimination technology should go hand in hand with sound regulatory systems so that Africa can benefit from the innovation, taking into account trans-boundary issues.

In this case, a regional regulatory approach needs to be pursued in addition to the national regulatory systems approach.

The work will require building strong collaborative arrangements between countries and harmonising technical requirements and processes for regulating the innovation, the most practical being at regional level.

Building on the experience gained from its two programmes, namely African Biosafety Network of Expertise (ABNE) and African Medicines Regulatory Harmonization (AMRH), the NEPAD Agency will facilitate and coordinate the capacity building process at regional level.

To this end, the NEPAD Agency has already established mechanisms for establishing joint working groups that can work at regional level on regulatory matters which will be adapted for this project.

Updated: 09.06.2017 13:25
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